Fighting Chance Judo Inclusion Programmes

Safer Kent
The Fighting Chance Inclusion Programme, started in Dartford has been one of the trusts major successes. Working with British Judo, Kent Police, Kent Fire and Rescue and the local communities, the programme has managed to get groups of young people to re-focus their lives. Judo is not the aim of the programme, but it allows the young people to develop self-confidence as well as anger management. The copyrighted programme developed by the programme team and approved by British Judo is based on rigorous and challenging lessons that allow the young people to be put forward for their Red Bely Grade at 6 weeks and their Yellow Belt Grade after 12 weeks. The programme has not only succeeded in helping the young people and their families, it had helped British Judo expand the reputation of Dartford as the Judo Centre of excellence in the South East. More importantly it continues to attract volunteer coaches and now has many of the graduates from the programme attending as mentors, Andy Dodd, the Dartford Fighting Chance Judo coach and Paul Squire founding partner, were asked by the graduates of the programme to help them start their own club in Dartford. This club is now maintaining itself and ensuring that the young people never revert back to their previous habits. The back bone of the club is its ethos of hard work and respect.

Licence2Kill Road Safety Campaign for new drivers

L2K-logo
In the last three years 187 people aged 17-24 were killed or seriously injured as car drivers or passengers on the roads in Kent and Medway. Road Safety partners work together to bring L2K to young people across the county with the aim of educating and influencing their decisions. ‘Licence to Kill?’ is a theatre education project which explores the circumstances and consequences of a road traffic crash. A film of a crash in the local area has been specially recreated. As the drama unfolds and the emergency services arrive on the scene, the faces on film literally step onto stage. Pausing the film for a moment, they speak to the audience about their experiences, the reactions of the driver and passengers, the medical implications and how seeing such trauma affects them personally. The audience then hears from other people brave enough to get on stage and share their stories about losing a loved one or being seriously injured in a collision. Since 2007, around 80,000 young people have seen the production. ‘Licence to Kill?’ has won a Gold Award from the Chartered Institute of Public Relations, as well as a national ‘Learning on Screen’ Award from the British Universities Film and Video Council.

Grants often link the energy of youth with the needs of eldery residents

Safer Kent
The Fighting Chance Inclusion Programme, started in Dartford has been one of the trusts major successes. Working with British Judo, Kent Police, Kent Fire and Rescue and the local communities, the programme has managed to get groups of young people to re-focus their lives. Judo is not the aim of the programme, but it allows the young people to develop self-confidence as well as anger management. The copyrighted programme developed by the programme team and approved by British Judo is based on rigorous and challenging lessons that allow the young people to be put forward for their Red Bely Grade at 6 weeks and their Yellow Belt Grade after 12 weeks. The programme has not only succeeded in helping the young people and their families, it had helped British Judo expand the reputation of Dartford as the Judo Centre of excellence in the South East. More importantly it continues to attract volunteer coaches and now has many of the graduates from the programme attending as mentors, Andy Dodd, the Dartford Fighting Chance Judo coach and Paul Squire founding partner, were asked by the graduates of the programme to help them start their own club in Dartford. This club is now maintaining itself and ensuring that the young people never revert back to their previous habits. The back bone of the club is its ethos of hard work and respect.

Hard Hitting programme about young drivers Licence 2 Kill reaches 10 000 17 year olds every year.

Licence to Kill

In the last three years 187 people aged 17-24 were killed or seriously injured as car drivers or passengers on the roads in Kent and Medway. Road Safety partners work together to bring L2K to young people across the county with the aim of educating and influencing their decisions. ‘Licence to Kill?’ is a theatre education project which explores the circumstances and consequences of a road traffic crash. A film of a crash in the local area has been specially recreated. As the drama unfolds and the emergency services arrive on the scene, the faces on film literally step onto stage. Pausing the film for a moment, they speak to the audience about their experiences, the reactions of the driver and passengers, the medical implications and how seeing such trauma affects them personally. The audience then hears from other people brave enough to get on stage and share their stories about losing a loved one or being seriously injured in a collision.

Since 2007, around 80,000 young people have seen the production. ‘Licence to Kill?’ has won a Gold Award from the Chartered Institute of Public Relations, as well as a national ‘Learning on Screen’ Award from the British Universities Film and Video Council.

Helping young people preapre safely for the move to senior school

Safer Kent

The Fighting Chance Inclusion Programme, started in Dartford has been one of the trusts major successes. Working with British Judo, Kent Police, Kent Fire and Rescue and the local communities, the programme has managed to get groups of young people to re-focus their lives.

Judo is not the aim of the programme, but it allows the young people to develop self-confidence as well as anger management. The copyrighted programme developed by the programme team and approved by British Judo is based on rigorous and challenging lessons that allow the young people to be put forward for their Red Bely Grade at 6 weeks and their Yellow Belt Grade after 12 weeks.

The programme has not only succeeded in helping the young people and their families, it had helped British Judo expand the reputation of Dartford as the Judo Centre of excellence in the South East. More importantly it continues to attract volunteer coaches and now has many of the graduates from the programme attending as mentors,
Andy Dodd, the Dartford Fighting Chance Judo coach and Paul Squire founding partner, were asked by the graduates of the programme to help them start their own club in Dartford. This club is now maintaining itself and ensuring that the young people never revert back to their previous habits. The back bone of the club is its ethos of hard work and respect.

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